This Month's Recipe...

April – Beef, Sesame and Spring Greens in Soy Broth

From page 358 of Kitchenella.

Imitating the big bowls of food that my children love to eat in noodle bars, using thin slices of beef leftover from the roast; the secret is to lay the beef on top of the soup at the last minute, so it does not stew and turn tough in the hot broth.

Serves 2

2 nests of Chinese egg noodles
2 tablespoons sesame seeds
600-900ml/1-1½ pints beef or chicken stock (see p390 of Kitchenella)
2 tablespoons light soy sauce
1 tablespoon Shaoxing wine or sherry
2 handfuls of finely shredded spring greens or pak choi
2 spring onions, green ends only, sliced into rounds
4 thin slices of cold beef
To serve: coriander leaves, sliced red chilli (optional)

Fill a large pan with water, bring to the boil and cook the egg noodle nests for 3 minutes. Drain, refresh with cold water and set to one side. It does not matter if they seem a little sticky, they will loosen up when added to the broth later.

Dry the pan and toast the sesame seeds over a medium-high heat until golden. Transfer to a plate and set aside. Heat the stock with the soy sauce and wine or sherry to boiling point then add the greens (but not the spring onion).

Simmer for about 3 minutes, then add back the noodles. Heat to boiling point again, taste for seasoning (add salt or more soy sauce if necessary) then ladle into two bowls. Scatter the spring onion over, then lay the beef slices on top. Finally, scatter over the toasted sesame seeds, the coriander and chilli (if using) and serve immediately.

Kitchen Note:

You can make this soup with cold chicken, pork or cooked prawns – or just simply use a good, deep-flavoured stock.

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monthly recipe

April – Beef, Sesame and Spring Greens in Soy Broth

Imitating the big bowls of food that my children love to eat in noodle bars, using thin slices of beef leftover from the roast; the secret is to lay the beef on top of the soup at the last minute, so it does not stew and turn tough in the hot broth.

read more >>